NOT NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC –  

Dec. 17, 2021 – She added that watching it initially helped her feel cool and like she was “one of the guys.” Ultimately, however, she admits it led to her suffering nightmares because some of the content she watched was so violent and abusive. It also shaped the way that she saw sex, dating and herself in general. “I’m so angry that porn is so loved, and I’m so angry at myself for thinking that it was OK,” she continued. “Women’s bodies don’t look like that. We don’t come like that.”

This isn’t the first time Eilish has shared about her view of pornography. In her song “Male Fantasy,” Eilish sings about distracting herself with pornography and comparing herself to the woman in the video: “I hate the way she looks at me / I can’t stand the dialogue, she would never be / That satisfied, it’s a male fantasy.”

Exposure to pornography has never been easier, as the Internet and social media make it easily accessible. One Barna study showed that younger generations are seeking out porn more and more. Eilish was only 11 years old when she began watching it; some as young as 9 years old have admitted to watching it. The younger the addiction starts, the deeper impact it can have on one’s view of life and relationships.

For decades, research has detailed harmful effects of repeated exposure to pornography, but that conversation has typically circled around men. Women have finally been added to the conversation within the recent years, but studies still often skews toward men, leaving women as simply an added statistic instead of a necessary piece of the puzzle that needs to be solved. We know that repeated exposure harm mean and women in different ways.

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