The Vanilla is Killer – 

May 28, 2019 –  “As a result of this perception, a lot of kids pick up e-cigarette smoking,” Wu said. “There’s so many kids who are smoking e-cigarettes. And these kids are going to become adults. And these adults can become elderly patients that I as a cardiologist will take care of later on.” The US Food and Drug Administration announced in November that vaping had increased nearly 80% among high schoolers and 50% among middle schoolers since the year before. Experts also worry that the devices could put kids’ developing brains at risk, get them hooked on nicotine early in life and be a gateway to smoking and other drugs. But the long-term effects aren’t clear. In the new study, which included six e-liquids with varying nicotine concentrations, Wu’s team found evidence of toxic effects — including poorer cell survival and signs of increased inflammation — on a type of cardiovascular cell. As proxy for what might happen in someone’s blood vessels, the researchers observed how these cells responded when in contact with e-liquids as well as fluid from the blood of a small group of participants who had vaped. These effects varied between the liquids, with the most potent being a cinnamon-flavored product.

Full Story @ WRALTechWire.com

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