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Sept. 13, 2022 – Another bonus: Dr. Willeumier says you don’t have to pick up a specific genre, like classic literature, to see the benefits. If you prefer a whodunit, go right ahead and enjoy it. Not only are you more likely to focus and actually pay attention if you’re invested in a book, but there’s a better chance you’ll read for longer if you actually like what’s on the page in front of you. Whether romance novels or biographies are your jam, crack open that book and set a timer for 15 minutes (if you need it). There’s plenty of research to support Dr. Willumier’s assertions. Previous studies show that activities like reading can improve brain health as people age and prevent the onset of diseases like Alzheimer’s. Moreover, it can have an indirect impact on your cognitive function by helping other things that are critical for keeping your mind sharp. For example, reading is shown to enhance sleep quality and reduce stress, both of which are key components of a strong brain.

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