IT’S SO HARD –   

Nov. 18, 2022 – The goal should not be to plan or control every aspect of the holidays or get through them without slip-ups. Rather, the goal should be entering the holiday season with a plan to help you avoid triggers, forgive and grow from slip-ups and embrace flexibility when things don’t go as expected. To help avoid relapse while navigating the holiday season, consider these tips from the experts at Alsana, a national eating recovery community that serves adult clients of all genders through in-person and virtual programs:

1. Know your relapse triggers. Triggers are stimuli that create intense, uncomfortable or even intolerable emotions. These triggers can send you into a reactive state, making you vulnerable to compulsive behaviors or old coping mechanisms you used to rely upon for escape or distraction. If there are certain situations or topics you find difficult, be aware of them and have a plan to address or avoid them as needed.

2. Keep appointments with your care team. Because the holiday season is so busy, it can be tempting to put a pause on your recovery, but experts agree that’s not ideal. Keep meeting with your dietitian and attending therapy as usual. Even if you’re going home for the holidays, make it a priority to meet with your care team via phone or video chat. To help avoid relapse while navigating the holiday season, consider these tips from the experts at Alsana, a national eating recovery community that serves adult clients of all genders through in-person and virtual programs:

3. Communicate with members of your support network. Let your close friends or family members know the season may be difficult for you. Talk with them about any specific concerns you have regarding meals, routines, family or situations that may trigger you, and remind them how much you appreciate and rely on their encouragement and support. If you need additional reinforcements, Alsana offers free online support groups.

4. Set clear boundaries. Your loved ones can’t read your mind. Make sure you communicate with loved ones about what’s helpful, what’s OK and what’s not OK as you work to maintain your recovery. They may not get it right the first time around, but if you continue to self-advocate, your boundaries will become clear in time…

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